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"Every Child Flourishing"

Year 6 Science

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring

Summer 1

Summer 2

Year 6

Electricity

1. How do scientists represent how circuits work?

2. How can the number of cells/voltage of cells used affect the circuit components?

3. How can we change the brightness of a lamp?

4. How can we change the loudness of a buzzer?

5. How do switches work?

6. Assessment

7. Review of insecure concepts / deeper learning

Evolution

1. Who was Mary Anning and what did she contribute to science?

2. What do palaeontologists learn from studying fossils?

3. Who was Charles Darwin and what is his theory of natural selection?

4. How similar are offspring to their parents?

5. How have animals adapted over time?

6. How have plants adapted over time?

7. Assessment

8. Review of insecure concepts / deeper learning.

Light

1. How can we see around corners?

2. How do our eyes make us see?

3. What is light?

4. How can we change shadows?

5. Assessment

6. Review of insecure concepts / deeper learning

 

Animals including humans

1. What is in our blood?

2. How is blood pumped around our bodies?

3. How does the heart work?

4. What makes our heart rate change?

5. How does alcohol affect our bodies?

6. How does smoking affect our bodies?

7. How does diet and exercise affect our bodies?

8. Assessment

9. Review of insecure concepts / deeper learning

Living things and their habitats

1. Who was Carl Linnaues and what did he contribute to science?

2. What different vertebrates are there?

3. What different invertebrates are there?

4. What different arthropods are there?

5. Who was Louis Pasteur and what did he contribute to science?

6. Are all trees the same?

7. What living things are there in our local environment?

8. Assessment

9. Review of insecure concepts / deeper learning

Working scientifically

1.1  planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary

1.2  taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision

1.3  recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, and bar and line graphs

1.4  using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests

1.5  using simple models to describe scientific ideas

1.6  reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations

1.7    identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.